Tuesday, June 09, 2015

Security


We left out of town yesterday--just the girls and I.  As I'm very cautious I don't normally post about leaving out of town, but B's going to be home.  Also, we finally got a security system which helps me feel a little more, ahem, secure.  At least in theory.

B was out of town a few weeks ago and we had just installed the system.  He and I were so glad to finally have something like this in place as I've been wanting one for years.  So we got our security system all set up (SimpliSafe* for those of you wondering...totally recommend) and instead of making me less paranoid I was a basket case. In part I think it's because we had just installed it when B left, so the newness of actually having a security system hadn't worn off yet.  And while the girls know about the system, we haven't yet talked through "what to do" scenarios if the alarm were to actually go off.  Therefore I found myself just as unable to fall asleep because I found myself anticipating this alarm sounding in the middle of the night and what would I do if that actually happened?

Feeling safe and secure in my home has been something I've struggled with since I was a young child living in Gering, Nebraska otherwise known as Mayberry.  As an adult I've also struggled with this and it seems that facts and statistics have little to do with it, but rather my perception. I wish I could pinpoint what it is that makes me feel 'unsafe' but with most things I'm sure it's a combination of stuff. One thing that I don't like is having a home with multiple points of entry, and with each move we make we are always gaining another point of entry or two.  In NYC we had one door to get in and out of the apartment. That coupled with the fact that we lived in a security monitored high rise with a door man made me feel very safe.  In fact living in NYC was the home I have felt safest in in my adult life. Safer than even Provo, Utah. Anyway, our current house has the most entry points so far.  But like I said, this isn't the whole of it... I've always been quite a worry wort when it comes to home break-ins.

It's been a few weeks now, we still need to talk to the girls (I understand you can never really prepare for these things, but much like talking about fire safety which I think is equally unpredictable, I think this is important we run through scenarios) and I'm much more at ease with the system I still find myself not necessarily feeling more "secure." Perhaps I view it a bit like self defense classes my friends took in college--a little bit of a false sense of security?  OK, I do feel slightly more secure-- I've got some quick ways of contacting help outside of fumbling for my phone in the dark AND the fact that waking up to a blaring alarm would definitely be preferable to waking up to an intruder already in my house--yes, those things certainly help.  But you know, nothing is fool-proof or a 100% guarantee.

I would LOVE to hear any thoughts or experiences you've had with home security.  Did an alarm system actually help you or someone you knew, out in a bad situation?  Did it at least help you feel more safe?  Have any of you had bad experiences with alarm/security systems?  And what about those of you who just don't believe in such devices?  Are you just more laid back, have a come-what-may attitude or is it something else?  

*To be clear I'm not being paid by Simplisafe for this post, but I have been telling all my friends and family about it.  It is an award winning system that you install yourself--one reason costs are so low.  Additionally it's completely customizable for your needs and if you move you can even take it with you!  If you've thought about a security system this is a great way to go.  

11 comments:

  1. A good friend of mine had her house broken into a couple months ago. No one was home at the time, thankfully, but it was a very traumatic experience for her. While the police were there investigating my friend commented to them that her next door neighbor was out of town and had yesterday's newspaper in the driveway to announce it, so why did the intruders choose her house instead? The police officer pointed to the little security system sign in the neighbor's yard and said, because of that sign. They told her that random break-ins almost never happen in homes that are labeled with security systems. My friend had a security system installed the next day. I hope that you can feel a little bit more secure knowing that just having the security system can potentially discourage intruders from choosing your house.

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    1. Rachel--Good to know! I mean I'm so sorry that happened to your friend--so awful--but I'm glad to hear the police tell her a security system actual helps prevent these things. I mean, they definitely should so in a way it's a no-brainer, but still...it's good hearing it.

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  2. My crazy border collie/shepherd dog is my security system. At night, she is on high alert and will bark at any out--of-the-ordinary sounds. We've never trained her to be our guardian but it seems hard wired into her. She rotates where she sleeps at night -- can be found either beside our bed, at the top or bottom of the stairs. She's the last to bed and the first one up. When my husband is out of town, she makes the rounds more frequently (he's her favorite and I think she's just walking around looking for him or maybe she's taking care of us until he returns?). I actually wake sometimes and hear her nails clacking as she walks the floors and then settles next to the bed. Her presence is a comfort to me and I wouldn't sleep well without a dog in the house.

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    1. Jillbert--I actually would love to get a dog one day. For both the companionship/love of a dog and the security.

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  3. When I was a teenager, my dad owned a business that sold and monitored alarm systems, so we had one in our house. One year for their anniversary, my parents went away for a night to a local hotel, leaving me and my older sister in charge of the five younger siblings. Setting the alarm was totally routine, and we didn't have any increased concern just because our parents were gone.

    In the middle if the night, my sister and I (who shared a room) were suddenly awoken by two police officers who had their guns and lights drawn and we're clearing our house. The alarm was blaring (all 7 of us kids had slept through it!) and the police had been dispatched. The officers checked the rest if the house, and told us the handle of back door had been removed, which was how they got into the house. They were able to trace footsteps from the back door, through our recently irrigated lawn, and out to our backyard fence.

    I don't recall being particularly freaked out about it as a kid, but as an adult, it's an amazing and scary experience to look back on.

    Several years (decades!) ago, I obtained a concealed carry permit and began carrying a small revolver in my purse. That DEFINITELY made me feel way more paranoid than secure, and I eventually stopped carrying because I thought I might accidentally shoot someone due to an unreasonably heightened sense of fear. So I totally get what you're feeling with your new alarm system.

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    1. Wow! What an experience. I can't believe you weren't more freaked out. And SO glad to know the police came to the rescue...and that you kids set it and everything. I mean all the dominos had to be in place for that story to end up a happy one. I can only imagine your parents gut wrenching horror.....phew!

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  4. When I was a teenager, my dad owned a business that sold and monitored alarm systems, so we had one in our house. One year for their anniversary, my parents went away for a night to a local hotel, leaving me and my older sister in charge of the five younger siblings. Setting the alarm was totally routine, and we didn't have any increased concern just because our parents were gone.

    In the middle if the night, my sister and I (who shared a room) were suddenly awoken by two police officers who had their guns and lights drawn and we're clearing our house. The alarm was blaring (all 7 of us kids had slept through it!) and the police had been dispatched. The officers checked the rest if the house, and told us the handle of back door had been removed, which was how they got into the house. They were able to trace footsteps from the back door, through our recently irrigated lawn, and out to our backyard fence.

    I don't recall being particularly freaked out about it as a kid, but as an adult, it's an amazing and scary experience to look back on.

    Several years (decades!) ago, I obtained a concealed carry permit and began carrying a small revolver in my purse. That DEFINITELY made me feel way more paranoid than secure, and I eventually stopped carrying because I thought I might accidentally shoot someone due to an unreasonably heightened sense of fear. So I totally get what you're feeling with your new alarm system.

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  5. I have heard the same thing about just having a security system sign/stickers in front of your house will deter a break-in/intruder. They would rather go for the easier house that they know won't have an alarm go off. Another security feature that I had on my townhouse was when we got new windows the latches were on the side of the window out of view when standing outside instead of right on top. When standing outside you couldn't see if the window was unlocked or not and they were triple paned glass. It would take a lot of effort and noise to break those windows.

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  6. Anonymous2:32 PM

    When my children were small, I told them that if I ever called them by their middle names it meant for them to get help immediately. We planned an escape route in and around our home to our neighbors. And if we were in public and I called them by their middle names, for them to stay away from me and go to the nearest adult and have them call for help. I was paranoid! :-)

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  7. Hi from Nebraska! I'm in a "big" city, but know where Gering is. My security system is a small, private, weapon collection, very good weapons training, and less than welcoming dogs. All are sweet, wonderful dogs outside the house or if you're invited in. The worst looking, a low, wide Pit Bull Terrier would only be a cheerful welcoming committee, everyone is his best friend EVER. The Mastiff Great Dane mix may sit on you, if he could be bothered to move. They sound like the hounds from hell however if you approach the house, and look evil. The one however to watch out for is a Golden Retriever English Springer Spaniel mix. You threaten her turf or human, you will face an enraged 75 pound ball of fury. She doesn't bark. She will stare you down or you will see those hackles raise and the threat growling grumble start. That's been enough to stop the lone idiot who wanted to try something.

    You won't get past my dog throwing a tantrum, my training and my nosy neighbor. I'm not worried.

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  8. Thank you for being so open and honest about your fears with feeling safe in your home. I am disabled and that adds a whole new level of feeling not very secure. We recently had a fire drill at work and as a disabled person, these sorts of scenarios make me uneasy. All this being said, it is nice in a way to see that others take these same fears seriously. Thank you!
    http://www.pricealarms.com.au/contact

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